Teaching Wwise Game Audio Course at Berklee Online

Teaching Wwise Game Audio Course at Berklee Online

Berklee Online - Game Audio Production with Wwise - Taught by Aaron Brown Sound

Learn Game Audio Production with Wwise – Berklee Online

Feeling overwhelmed at the idea of learning Game Audio? You are not alone! Game Audio encompasses all audio disciplines that individually can take a lifetime to master.

Have no fear! I am here to guide you on your quest for Wwise and Game audio knowledge in the Game Audio Production course at Berklee Online.

This course treats the project as if it was a real world assignment. It covers setting up your system, pre-production, making a mock-up, creating ambience, sound design,  foley, adaptive music using Wwise, working with dialogue, mixing, and getting a gig! These are the same steps I’ve gone through on almost every project over the last 10 years so you can be assured the skills apply to future jobs.

The course enables you to dive into the Unity game Angry Bots and award winning hit Limbo to create your own immersive sonic experiences!

Guidance is provided through the whole experience there are chats and discussions. This prevents roadblocks on your path to success which is critical when learning a tech heavy skill such as Game Audio.

Still not sold on the course? I’ll let these student reviews do the talking for me:

REVIEWS:

Aaron is the greatest tutor I have ever had! Great feedback, plus touches on topics that are helpful for people working the industry. Can’t say enough about him!

Aaron was great – he’s very insightful and practical. He put some complicated concepts into simple terms for us, even adding a good deal of additional info and links for us to check out on the forum. His feedback in particular was always really spot on and helpful, never making us feel like we were out of our depth. You could tell he was very invested in our success!

I am a freelance video game composer/sound designer so this class was excellent for adding to my skill sets.

The embeded videos with specific walkthroughs were great for seeing how things worked in Wwise, but the class discussions and webchats were extremely helpful and in-depth, giving us a lot of context for the reality of game audio. Being able to plug our sounds into pre-made games and seeing existing Wwise sessions in action was fantastic.

 –Tutor feedback was beyond great Tutor answer every question we had, and better yet went further and gave us video examples. Required reading was great. Course content was great

Aaron has a clear passion not only for game audio, but also for helping people understand how it works. His feedback on my assignments was very thorough and helpful for improving the quality of my work. Never did I feel like he was giving my assignment a very casual and cursory listen since each time he was able to identify specific parts that needed improvements even if they were just minor ones. In the class chats he presented a healthy mix of industry information as well as demonstrations of techniques to record, edit, effect and mix audio for games. He ensured everyone’s questions were answered and even offered a dedicated, private chat session for people who needed additional help troubleshooting technical issues.Easily one of the most dedicated instructors I have had at Berklee Online or really any other educational institution I’ve attended.

There’s no substitute for actually putting into practice the things you’ve been taught in the videos and reading. Each once kept the focus of that week’s assignment in mind and challenged me to demonstrate what I had learned. When each assignment was complete, it was satisfying to hear my newly created game audio in the game as if it belonged there all along.

 

 

As you can see from the reviews, if you want to work in the industry and create compelling sound in Game Audio for a living, this course will give you a huge leap forward in getting there!

If you have any questions about the course, or game audio in general, leave a comment and I’ll reply ASAP.

 

Learn Game Audio Production with Wwise – Berklee Online

SYLLABUS:

Lesson 1: Setting up your Game Audio Production Environment

  • Game Production Roles
  • Game Development Software
  • Audio Middleware
  • File Organization and Data Backup
  • File Management Tips

Lesson 2: Pre-Production

  • Defining Your Sound
  • Audio Design Goals
  • Imitate or Innovate
  • Spotting
  • Planning It Out: Organizing Your Time and Effort
  • Creating a Schedule
  • Designing a Mockup

Lesson 3: Ambience

  • Telling a Story with Background Sound
  • Creating Ambience
  • Defining the Boundaries
  • Slicing Up the Loop
  • Dynamic Elements in Ambient Sound Design
  • Creating Sounds to Blend with Ambience

Lesson 4: Sound Design

  • Capture your Sounds
  • Foley
  • A Noisy Library
  • Searching for Sounds
  • Software Plugins
  • Interactive Sounds

Lesson 5: Adaptive Music

  • Using Temp Scores to Explore the Effect of Music on Games
  • Temp Music
  • What Makes Music “Adaptive”?
  • Parameters and Switches
  • Adaptive Composition Strategies
  • Temp to Real Score
  • Low Health Music
  • Adding a Vertical Layer
  • Extending Your Music

Lesson 6: Composing a Musical Maze

  • Horizontal Approach
  • Adding a Horizontal Layer
  • Codecs
  • Creating a Conversion Settings Share Set
  • Playlists
  • Musical QA
  • Checking Your Transitions
  • Trade-Offs

Lesson 7: Stingers, Transitions, and Custom Cues

  • Mind the Gap: Understanding and Working with Transitions
  • Transition Examples
  • Musical Glue: Creating Your Own Transition
  • Musical Explanation Points: Working with Stingers
  • Identifying Stingers
  • Getting Crafty with Custom Cues
  • Composing a Stinger

Lesson 8: Dialog

  • The Voice of the Game: An Overview of Dialog Needs in a Game
  • Spotting for Dialog
  • Preparing for a Recording Session
  • Script and Studio Prep
  • Working with Actors
  • Preparing Dialog for the Game
  • Editing and Processing

Lesson 9: Horror Ambience and Music

  • Setting Up Limbo
  • Foley Performance
  • Visceral Sound
  • Designing Fear
  • Implementing Fear
  • Sound Design and Music

Lesson 10: Interactive Music

  • Video Game Genre Aesthetics
  • Plugins and Synthesizers for Horror Music
  • The Power of RTPCs
  • Integrating Music into Wwise that Responds to the Tension Parameter
  • Composing Stingers for Horror

Lesson 11: Mixing

  • Traditional Mixing vs. In-Game Mixing
  • Runtime Effects
  • Assigning Individual Events to Groups
  • HDR (High Dynamic Range) Mixing Systems and Surround Sound
  • Memory Management, Voices, Platforms, and Localization

Lesson 12: Getting a Gig

  • Capturing Game Footage to Make a Demo
  • Comparing an Original Audio Mockup to the Final Audio Demo
  • Showcasing Your Skills and Personality on Your Website
  • Audio Demo Reels
  • Networking

 

  • Milovan Guich

    I studied a carrer of sound engineering in Peru, I have post produccion knowledge but I have never designed sound for a videogame. I want to work in game industry as soon as possible, What course is most appropriate for me? Game Audio Production with Wwise or Introduction to Game Audio.